Incontrare alberto angela a roma

Incontri - ALBERTO ANGELA,Al via trilogia su Nerone, 'la penna è la mia cinepresa'

Con Alberto Angela a Roma, "la regina delle acque" secondo gli antichi. Il fontanone del Gianicolo, la fontana dei fiumi, la fontana di Trevi, il parco degli acquedotti.

E poi, i quasi "nasoni", le fontanelle sparse per tutta la città. La storia di Roma, dall'impero al barocco, è in qualche modo scritta dall'acqua.

Del suo rapporto con le fontanelle e le fontane parla con . Incontriamo Alberto Angela presso la sede dell’Agenzia MN, a Roma. Arriva puntualissimo e premuroso come un vecchio amico. In realtà, ci siamo conosciuti anni or sono a Cerveteri per la consegna di un premio.

Si comunica che mercoledì 16 dicembre p.v., dalle ore alle ore , gli studenti delle classi che aderiranno all’iniziativa in oggetto potranno incontrare lo scrittore e studioso Alberto Angela che presenterà il suo ultimo libro ‘San Pietro’, edito da Rizzoli, sulla storia e l’arte della Basilica di San Pietro a Roma e sulle bellezze del Vaticano.


Spettacoli e Cultura - Interamente girato in altissima definizione 4k HDR e visibile anche su Rai4k canale di Tivusat , il reportage realizzato grazie alla collaborazione del Centro di Produzione di Napoli con il Centro Televisivo Vaticano e Officina della Genocidio, Pechino sotto accusa. Il tocco magico dei coniugi Zingaretti. Persino Piero e Alberto Angela pare lo guardano con quel rispetto che si deve a chi fa "i numeroni".

Un posto al sole anticipazioni: Clara becca Alberto insieme a Barbara La proposta di matrimonio di Film e Programmi di Oggi Sabato 20 Febbraio Terzo trailer ufficiale in italiano Lega, Salvini e la svolta. La riunione 'storica' e la lite con la Meloni. Perfino gli ormai ex euroscettici Claudio Borghi e Alberto Bagnai ambiscono a una poltrona o uno o Cannibal Music Awards - Il meglio e pure il peggio della musica dell'anno.

Fuori la guerra dalla storia - Angela Dogliotti. Rich in atmosphere and historical information, A Day in Ancient Rome is a voyage into a world both distant to us in time and surprisingly near in its habits, mores, and passions. Paperback , pages. Published May 26th by Europa Editions first published May 26th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up.

I know of a great book that takes place in ancient Rome. Lists with This Book. Aug 18, Sjo rated it really liked it Shelves: Maybe it's pulp, and maybe there might be some looseness in terms of prose Set in one 24 hour period in AD Rome, under Emperor Trajan, at the height of the Roman empire, the reader time travels to a 'typical' in a Jack Bauer sort of way day into the gory details of everyday living for the Roman citizen.

Where are the bathrooms? Romans read outloud, and quite happily go to the bathroom in open, common long bench style formation bathrooms--with running water beneath--happily chatting during the business. Romans lived in high-rises, and the wealthy lived on the first floor as smoke tended to make the top floors filthy not to mention that buildings had a habit of occassionally collapsing due to illegal zoning. The neighborhood bar provided drinks and apparently, the option to enjoy the waitress upstairs.

Gladiators are the matinee idols of the day, and dinner parties operate at another level compared to what we might be used to Aug 08, Suzanne added it Shelves: It took me over 7 weeks to get through this page book, not because it was difficult, but because it was too easy.

This was narrated in a breathless, present-tense, first-person-plural, we-are-there-style that would be more appropriate for a teen audience and which grated loudly on my nerves.

However, I stuck with it because I learned a lot, despite the annoying delivery. A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome is well-researched and the author, host of two Italian popular science TV shows, is clea It took me over 7 weeks to get through this page book, not because it was difficult, but because it was too easy.

A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome is well-researched and the author, host of two Italian popular science TV shows, is clearly enamored of the subject matter. The book describes 24 hours in Rome in the year CE and focuses on minute and unexpected details that create a vivid picture of everyday life in a world years away.

The stories Alberto Angela tells about members of the various social and economic classes, exactly how they spent their time, and in what specific environments and societal systems, are indeed vibrant.

But there is sometimes TMI, as in descriptions of public restroom habits and the gory and sadistic games in the Colosseum. There also seemed to be, in any description of attractive young women, a tendency on the part of the author to leer, which was off-putting. Discussions of banquets, diets and food are more fun.

I had no idea that Roman hosts of that era, eager to impress, would serve their guests camel feet, roast flamingos, and peacock brains. It would have been even more fun if the writing style did not make me grit my teeth. It might work well, though, as a reference for authors of historical fiction who need a source for authentic and colorful details for a Roman novel work-in-progress.

Excuse me, lover of great prose that I am, I have to go unclench my jaw now. View all 3 comments. Jan 25, Joel rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love the approach this book takes. The author tells us about everyday life in ancient Rome by following the course of a typical day he chooses a day in AD, when the Roman Empire was at its height , describing the activities people would have been engaged in hour by hour.

He covers upper class citizens, lower class, merchants, slaves; home life, commerce, entertainment, grooming, food If I had to make a criticism here, it would be that the book's focus on a single I love the approach this book takes. If I had to make a criticism here, it would be that the book's focus on a single point in time is a bit limiting.

We learn a great deal about AD; but the Empire was a long-lived beast. Angela does occasionally take a step back and tell us how certain details of Roman life evolved over time, but those details only come in snippets. The author isn't a professional historian or archaeologist; he's a television presenter, who has done a number of programs about ancient Rome.

This has brought him in contact with a number of actual archaeologists, some of whom apparently provided fact-checking and advice for the book. But this is not a scholarly presentation; there are no source notes and only a fairly skimpy bibliography. Serious students will probably not find this book to be an adequate reference. But that shouldn't trouble the casual reader, who should find the writing to be engaging and very readable.

I would love to find books, along these same lines, about other cultures and time periods. Apr 15, Susan rated it liked it Shelves: The book was good or bad depending on what you want from it.

If you're a serious student of Rome, Alberto Angela is not going to give you much to use in a research project. He hardly ever gives details about his sources, whether they be quotes from Juvenal or Horace, or research theories from a modern Italian classicist. Most of his sources are one researcher, so the diversity of opinions isn't great either. The publishers didn't opt to put in maps or many pictures, both of which would have been The book was good or bad depending on what you want from it.

The publishers didn't opt to put in maps or many pictures, both of which would have been exceptionally helpful.

I have no idea why there is no map, regardless of cost-saving possibilities--the whole book is a walk through Trajan's Rome, and a map would help conceptualize space. More pictures would also have been a benefit because Angela spends a great deal of text describing architecture and art maybe the publishers realized that the existence of the pictures make the text superfluous?

The editing was sloppy. The publishers should be embarrassed that they let Marcus Aurelius take credit for Marc Antony's funeral oration for Julius Caesar. But despite these problems, it was very accessible and a good appetizer for other, more detailed, books on Rome. Have you ever wished that you had a time machine so that you could go back in time and see how people used to live? Well you no longer have to. You just have to read this book. Jul 25, Steven Peterson rated it it was amazing.

This wonderful little work provides a fascinating way of learning about daily life in ancient Rome, based on the best knowledge of historians--by taking an hour by hour look at what the Romans do. The depiction of the day takes place in AD, under the reign of the Emperor Trajan. After a very brief examination of the era , we begin with life a few hours before dawn.

Streets are dark--as are houses. When night fell, darkness reigned in Rome; very few homes had lanterns or other forms of l This wonderful little work provides a fascinating way of learning about daily life in ancient Rome, based on the best knowledge of historians--by taking an hour by hour look at what the Romans do.

When night fell, darkness reigned in Rome; very few homes had lanterns or other forms of lighting. The book begins with the start of the day for a wealthy man, at 6 AM. His home the domus is described nicely. A slave begins heating up the "stove" in the kitchen. By 7, he begins dressing in his comfortable toga a nice diagram on page 47 illustrates the process. The book, thus, proceeds along these lines, with interruptions every so often to outline important aspects of Roman life. For instance, one such "time out" described the structure and functioni9ng of large apartment complexes that were manifest in many areas of Rome, the insula.

On throughout the day, until darkness arrives. By midnight shops are closed and locked, few people walk the streets and many of those who do are pretty unsavory. All in all, a nice little work for those who are curious about the lives of ancient Romans.

The hour by hour view works very nicely. Apr 03, Hristina Ivanova rated it really liked it Shelves: I've been eyeing this book for several years and never got round to reading it until now. I must say, I'm impressed. Very well written, humorous, educational, intriguing. It offers an insight into Rome's everyday life and, what's more, it's based on thorough research and scientific evidence.

I really liked the fact that the author constantly mentions where every piece of information comes from- either from a historical source, written evidence or artefacts. I would strongly reccomend this book no I've been eyeing this book for several years and never got round to reading it until now.

I would strongly reccomend this book not only to the avid history lovers, but also to anyone who wants to know more about Ancient Rome but can't take the workbooks' dryness. One very nice read! Sep 07, Jose rated it really liked it.

I was lucky enough to visit Rome this summer and it quickly became my favorite city on the planet. The huge monuments and relics of unbelievable beauty often made me daydream about what ancient Rome must have been like. I kept saying to my wife, "Oh wow can you imagine how this temple must have looked, how it must have felt to see all this marble and columns, it's like our version of heaven!

This book does a fantastic job doing just this, bringing ancient Rome back to life. Alberto Angela does I was lucky enough to visit Rome this summer and it quickly became my favorite city on the planet. Alberto Angela does this by taking us through one particular day in Rome in the year CE, the hieght of the Roman Empire. We walk around as a Roman citizen exploring everything from a typical house, apartment building, the baths, the colosseum, the Forum and even the bathrooms.

It is exquisitely detailed and endlessly fascinating. It is hard to believe just how similar these people and thier cosmopolitan culture were to ours, almost two thousand years ago. It was just so cringe inducing and dissonant to the topic that it destroyed the immersive quality a book like this can have.

I also did not particularly enjoy his going on and on about how everything from the modern world is derived from ancient Rome a stretch or his occasional sleaziness how many breasts do you need to mention in a nonfiction historical book? Dissatisfactions aside, there were a few interesting points that he made and I did enjoy some of the chapters, particularly those about the domus and the insulae, I just wish the book was written better.

Jul 16, Martin Gibbs rated it really liked it Shelves: This was a great, quick read, even given the flaws and the lack of any visuals. Rome was such a large city, even then, that a map would have been really helpful in following along. It was basically a pulp rad dressed up as history, but, seeing at it was on display at a Border's now out of business , I really didn't expect much more.

A good read for a long plane ride, or a great start for someone beginning to dig into Roman history. Jul 30, Ed rated it really liked it. Fascinating details emerge during your hour visit. Urine is a quite versatile fluid. Apr 07, Fluvia rated it really liked it Shelves: This was an excellent read!

I had known of Alberto Angela for a long time, as he's quite a TV personality in Italy, very famous for everyone who enjoys history. However, this was my first read and "encounter" with his work, and I must say I come out of it very satisfied.

This book tries, and very much succeeds, to make you feel as if you were walking through the streets of Rome. From dusk to midnight, Angela describes the rituals and happenings of a common day in Rome, which is something that oft This was an excellent read!

From dusk to midnight, Angela describes the rituals and happenings of a common day in Rome, which is something that often we have a lack of literature about. He has done his research into the subject through academic books and personal talks with archaeologists, and the references to sites like Pompei or Ostia or classical authors are numerous. His description of a Roman day is thorough, making a point of visiting as well the routines of slaves and common members of society, and not focusing as much as other works in patricians.

Small details that have made the difference for me are the description of archaeological objects such as paintings, tombstones or even beauty artifacts to draw inspiration from, and insert them in the book to give us a glimpse of how the life of their owners was, or using those names to present us "characters" of society.

He also focuses on subjects not as well known to the public eye, such as food or sexual practices. The main disadvantage of this book is that its bibliography is a bit small for such a large book more than pages , and I would have appreciated footnotes or end of chapter notes with the references used. Of course, this is probably due to Angela's will of making this an accesible book, and not an academic text; but, as someone who is an archaeologist, I would have wished to have more accurate quotations that I could look up to further deepen the knowledge.

To sum up, this was a very interesting book from which I learnt a great deal and I really recommend to everyone who is interested in Ancient Rome! Oct 01, Mercedes Rochelle rated it really liked it. In fact, author Alberto Angela is in the television business which takes him around the world, making him a very cosmopolitan tour guide. Alberto takes an unusual approach, but it really worked for me.

We are strangers—almost ghosts—who start walking through A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome can be taken essentially as a written TV documentary.

All the while the author describes details to us that are usually left out of our basic education. For instance, we watch a woman in the marketplace so the author can describe how Romans count: What does it mean? Our curiosity piqued, we walk over to get closer. The horn sign must mean four. The next page, we get a chart showing the different hand positions and what they probably mean. Frankly I never thought about how Romans count, so this was quite useful to me. Later on, Alberto gives us a lesson about the value of money in terms we can relate to today: In reality, they are missing an important detail: Of course, the baths are a thing of beauty and a major part of the daily routine.

Although to me it seemed like the book was written in one draft, I found it very enjoyable and learned much I will find useful in the future.

Alberto Angela ritorna a Giovedì Scienza per accompagnarci in un viaggio nel passato ad esplorare la vita quotidiana nell’antica Roma ricostruendo minuto per. Alberto Angela. Su Rai1 da stasera il classico appunatmento con Ulisse, il piacere della scoperta. La trasmissione che fa viaggiare in tutta Italia. Angela, Alberto Alberto Angela wurde in Paris geboren. In Rom studierte er Naturwissenschaften. Als Paläontologe nahm er an zahlreichen Ausgrabungsprojekten in Afrika und Asien teil und ist heute ein populärer Fernsehmoderator für naturwissenschaftliche Sendungen in Italien.

Italia nostra gli incontri in presenza dell'intero corso di formazione

Spettacoli e Cultura - Interamente girato in altissima definizione 4k HDR [EXTENDANCHOR] visibile anche su Rai4k canale di Tivusatil reportage realizzato grazie alla collaborazione del Centro di Produzione di Napoli con il Centro Televisivo Vaticano e Officina della Genocidio, Pechino sotto accusa. Il tocco go here dei coniugi Zingaretti.

Persino Piero e Alberto Angela pare "incontrare alberto angela a roma" guardano con quel rispetto che si doma a chi fa "i numeroni". Un posto al sole anticipazioni: Clara becca Alberto insieme a Barbara La proposta di matrimonio di Film e Incontrare alberto angela a roma di Oggi Sabato 20 Febbraio Terzo trailer ufficiale in italiano Lega, Salvini e la incontri gay a cordenons. La riunione 'storica' e la lite con la Meloni.

Perfino gli ormai ex euroscettici Claudio Borghi e Alberto Bagnai ambiscono a una poltrona o uno o Cannibal Music Awards - Il meglio e pure il peggio della musica dell'anno. Fuori la [EXTENDANCHOR] dalla storia - Angela Dogliotti.

Riflessioni sulla Chiesa del futuro. Con Gigi Proietti se ne va article source immenso capitolo del teatro italiano. Di recente aveva partecipato alla nuova [EXTENDANCHOR] di Ulisse con Alberto Angela. Migliaia di serate fuori casa. In teatri incontrare alberto angela a roma e meno belli, importanti o meno, barocchi o essenziali, comunque sia, Termini e condizioni d'uso - Contattaci.

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Leggi la notizia Persone: Genocidio, Pechino sotto accusa La riunione 'storica' inconyrare la lite con la [EXTENDANCHOR] Perfino gli ormai ex euroscettici Claudio Borghi e Alberto Bagnai ambiscono a una poltrona o uno o Sai che Libero ti offre una dove si incontrano i meridiani gratis con 5GB di spazio cloud su web, cellulare check this out tablet?

Meraviglie - S - Roma, la regina delle acque - Video - RaiPlay

Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Want to Read saving…. Want to Read Currently Reading Read. Refresh and try again. Open Preview See a Problem? Thanks for telling us about the problem. Return to Book Page. The roar of frenzied spectators inside the Coliseum during a battle between gladiators.

A crowd of onlookers gathered around a slave driver. The wondrous plenty of banquets where flamingos are roasted whole and wine flows like rivers. The silence of the baths and the boisterous taverns. Many books have dealt with the history of ancient Rome, but none has been able to The roar of frenzied spectators inside the Coliseum during a battle between gladiators.

Many books have dealt with the history of ancient Rome, but none has been able to bring its readers so near to daily life in the Imperial capital.

This extraordinary voyage of exploration, guided by Alberto Angela with the charm of a born story- teller, lasts twenty- four hours, beginning at dawn on an ordinary day in the year A.

The reader wakes in a rich patrician home and discovers frescoes, opulent furnishings and richly appointed boudoirs. Strolling though the splendors of the Roman Forum, one overhears both erudite opinions from learned orators and local ribaldry floating out from the public latrines.

One meets the intense gazes of Roman matriarchs strolling the streets, looks on as a banquet is prepared, and is afforded a peek into the sexual habits and fetishes of Roman patricians and plebs.

For all those who have ever dreamed of traveling back in time, Alberto Angela's narrative style will come as a welcome change to dry historical tomes. Rich in atmosphere and historical information, A Day in Ancient Rome is a voyage into a world both distant to us in time and surprisingly near in its habits, mores, and passions.

Paperback , pages. Published May 26th by Europa Editions first published May 26th To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. I know of a great book that takes place in ancient Rome. Lists with This Book. Aug 18, Sjo rated it really liked it Shelves: Maybe it's pulp, and maybe there might be some looseness in terms of prose Set in one 24 hour period in AD Rome, under Emperor Trajan, at the height of the Roman empire, the reader time travels to a 'typical' in a Jack Bauer sort of way day into the gory details of everyday living for the Roman citizen.

Where are the bathrooms? Romans read outloud, and quite happily go to the bathroom in open, common long bench style formation bathrooms--with running water beneath--happily chatting during the business. Romans lived in high-rises, and the wealthy lived on the first floor as smoke tended to make the top floors filthy not to mention that buildings had a habit of occassionally collapsing due to illegal zoning. The neighborhood bar provided drinks and apparently, the option to enjoy the waitress upstairs.

Gladiators are the matinee idols of the day, and dinner parties operate at another level compared to what we might be used to Aug 08, Suzanne added it Shelves: It took me over 7 weeks to get through this page book, not because it was difficult, but because it was too easy.

This was narrated in a breathless, present-tense, first-person-plural, we-are-there-style that would be more appropriate for a teen audience and which grated loudly on my nerves. However, I stuck with it because I learned a lot, despite the annoying delivery. A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome is well-researched and the author, host of two Italian popular science TV shows, is clea It took me over 7 weeks to get through this page book, not because it was difficult, but because it was too easy.

A Day in the Life of Ancient Rome is well-researched and the author, host of two Italian popular science TV shows, is clearly enamored of the subject matter. The book describes 24 hours in Rome in the year CE and focuses on minute and unexpected details that create a vivid picture of everyday life in a world years away. The stories Alberto Angela tells about members of the various social and economic classes, exactly how they spent their time, and in what specific environments and societal systems, are indeed vibrant.

But there is sometimes TMI, as in descriptions of public restroom habits and the gory and sadistic games in the Colosseum. There also seemed to be, in any description of attractive young women, a tendency on the part of the author to leer, which was off-putting. Discussions of banquets, diets and food are more fun. I had no idea that Roman hosts of that era, eager to impress, would serve their guests camel feet, roast flamingos, and peacock brains.

It would have been even more fun if the writing style did not make me grit my teeth. It might work well, though, as a reference for authors of historical fiction who need a source for authentic and colorful details for a Roman novel work-in-progress. Excuse me, lover of great prose that I am, I have to go unclench my jaw now. View all 3 comments. Jan 25, Joel rated it it was amazing Shelves: I love the approach this book takes.

The author tells us about everyday life in ancient Rome by following the course of a typical day he chooses a day in AD, when the Roman Empire was at its height , describing the activities people would have been engaged in hour by hour. He covers upper class citizens, lower class, merchants, slaves; home life, commerce, entertainment, grooming, food If I had to make a criticism here, it would be that the book's focus on a single I love the approach this book takes.

If I had to make a criticism here, it would be that the book's focus on a single point in time is a bit limiting. We learn a great deal about AD; but the Empire was a long-lived beast. Angela does occasionally take a step back and tell us how certain details of Roman life evolved over time, but those details only come in snippets. The author isn't a professional historian or archaeologist; he's a television presenter, who has done a number of programs about ancient Rome.

This has brought him in contact with a number of actual archaeologists, some of whom apparently provided fact-checking and advice for the book. But this is not a scholarly presentation; there are no source notes and only a fairly skimpy bibliography.

Serious students will probably not find this book to be an adequate reference. But that shouldn't trouble the casual reader, who should find the writing to be engaging and very readable.

I would love to find books, along these same lines, about other cultures and time periods. Apr 15, Susan rated it liked it Shelves: The book was good or bad depending on what you want from it.

If you're a serious student of Rome, Alberto Angela is not going to give you much to use in a research project. He hardly ever gives details about his sources, whether they be quotes from Juvenal or Horace, or research theories from a modern Italian classicist.

Most of his sources are one researcher, so the diversity of opinions isn't great either. The publishers didn't opt to put in maps or many pictures, both of which would have been The book was good or bad depending on what you want from it. The publishers didn't opt to put in maps or many pictures, both of which would have been exceptionally helpful. I have no idea why there is no map, regardless of cost-saving possibilities--the whole book is a walk through Trajan's Rome, and a map would help conceptualize space.

More pictures would also have been a benefit because Angela spends a great deal of text describing architecture and art maybe the publishers realized that the existence of the pictures make the text superfluous?

The editing was sloppy. The publishers should be embarrassed that they let Marcus Aurelius take credit for Marc Antony's funeral oration for Julius Caesar. But despite these problems, it was very accessible and a good appetizer for other, more detailed, books on Rome. Have you ever wished that you had a time machine so that you could go back in time and see how people used to live? Well you no longer have to. You just have to read this book. Jul 25, Steven Peterson rated it it was amazing.

This wonderful little work provides a fascinating way of learning about daily life in ancient Rome, based on the best knowledge of historians--by taking an hour by hour look at what the Romans do. The depiction of the day takes place in AD, under the reign of the Emperor Trajan.

After a very brief examination of the era , we begin with life a few hours before dawn. Streets are dark--as are houses. When night fell, darkness reigned in Rome; very few homes had lanterns or other forms of l This wonderful little work provides a fascinating way of learning about daily life in ancient Rome, based on the best knowledge of historians--by taking an hour by hour look at what the Romans do.

When night fell, darkness reigned in Rome; very few homes had lanterns or other forms of lighting. The book begins with the start of the day for a wealthy man, at 6 AM. His home the domus is described nicely. A slave begins heating up the "stove" in the kitchen. By 7, he begins dressing in his comfortable toga a nice diagram on page 47 illustrates the process. The book, thus, proceeds along these lines, with interruptions every so often to outline important aspects of Roman life. For instance, one such "time out" described the structure and functioni9ng of large apartment complexes that were manifest in many areas of Rome, the insula.

On throughout the day, until darkness arrives. By midnight shops are closed and locked, few people walk the streets and many of those who do are pretty unsavory. All in all, a nice little work for those who are curious about the lives of ancient Romans.

The hour by hour view works very nicely. Apr 03, Hristina Ivanova rated it really liked it Shelves: I've been eyeing this book for several years and never got round to reading it until now.

I must say, I'm impressed. Very well written, humorous, educational, intriguing. It offers an insight into Rome's everyday life and, what's more, it's based on thorough research and scientific evidence.